Teams


Team Theory is interested in single or comparative case studies to shed light on the reasons why populist forces gain electoral and political influence in some countries and not in others. ​There is a growing amount of research on populist forces across the world, yet some countries and regions have received little attention so far. In fact, we do not have much knowledge about negative cases, i.e. places in which populist leaders and parties are non-existent or politically irrelevant. We seek to develop individual theories and/or a broader theoretical framework to better understand the causes of populism.

TEAM LEAD:

Cristobal Rovira Kaltwasser

Universidad Diego Portales, Chile

cristobal.rovira@udp.cl

Simon Bornschier

University of Zurich, Switzerland

Marga Gomez-Reino

UNED, Spain

Vlastimil Havlik

Masaryk University, Czech Republic

Ivan Llamazares

University of Salamanca, Spain

Luke March

University of Edinburgh, UK

Takis Pappas

Albert Ludwig University of Freiburg, Germany​

Yannis Stavrakakis

Aristotle University of Thessaloniki​

Paul Kenny

Australian National University​


Team Textual analysis is interested in measuring the level of populist discourse by different parties and politicians. We provide data that primarily serve aggregate - level analyses, although our data may provide background information for individual - level studies. Our dataset is inclusive, covering most parties across Europe and the Americas.

TEAM LEAD:

Kirk A. Hawkins​

Brigham Young University, Provo

kirk.hawkins@byu.edu

Bruno Castanho Silva​

Central European University

Erin K. Jenne

Central European University

Levente Littvay

Central European University

Marijana Grbeša

University of Zagreb​

Berto Šalaj

University of Zagreb​

Luke March

University of Edinburgh​

Paris Aslanidis

University of Macedonia

Yannis Stavrakakis

Aristotle University of Thessaloniki​

Simon Franzmann

Heinrich Heine University of Dusseldorf​​


Without voters, populists flounder. But, when they succeed they can become powerful political forces. What draws citizens to populist leaders and the rhetoric they espouse? Team Experiments seeks a set of innovative experimental designs to test the political and social consequences of populist discourse for citizens in diverse contexts from Europe and the Americas. To that end, the team’s diverse group of scholars will work to blend their shared interests in populism as a subject of study with their expertise in experiments as a methodology.

TEAM LEADS:

Ryan Carlin​​

Georgia State University

rcarlin@gsu.edu

Rosario Aguilar

CIDE, Mexico

Nina Wiesehomeier​

IE University, Spain

Bruno de Castanho

Central European University

Ethan Busby

Northwestern University

Josh Gubler

Brigham Young University

Kirk Hawkins

Brigham Young Univeristy

Peter Achterberg

Tilburg University

Dick Houtman

University of Leuven

Roy Kemmers

Erasmus University Rotterdam

Sarah de Lange

University of Amsterdam

Matthijs Rooduijn

University of Amsterdam

Wouter van der Brug

University of Amsterdam

Nebojša Blanuša

University of Zagreb

Linda Bos

University of Amsterdam

Phil Habel

University of Glasgow

Elisabeth Ivarsflaten

University of Bergen

Roman Chytilek​

Masaryk University​

David Doyle​

Oxford University


Team Elite interviews uses in-depth interviews with mainstream and populist politicians to better understand the populist surge. We focus on how mainstream parties perceive and respond to populist parties. In the first project phase, we are interested in how mainstream politicians think about the (mal)functioning of representative democracy and about the concepts of 'ordinary people’ and ‘elite’. In the second phase, we study if mainstream politicians perceive populist parties as an electoral, or as a threat to democracy, and strategies they employ to counter these threats. We focus on consolidated majoritarian democracies with a concentrated party system (e.g. The UK), consolidated consensus democracies with a fragmented party system (e.g. The Netherlands), and unconsolidated democracies (e.g. Hungary).

Sarah de Lange

University of Amsterdam

Paul Taggart​

University of Sussex

Andrea Pirro

University of Sienna​

Steven Van Hauwaert

CIDE, Mexico


Team Expert surveys aims at constructing a comparative database covering parties and party systems in Europe and in Latin America. We understand populism as a separate dimension of party competition among political actors that may or may not become activated. Capturing degrees of populism along this continuum will allow us to explore how populism relates to other policy dimensions, such as for example the general left-right positioning. The resulting data can be used to explore individual level questions by linking survey data to party positions, but also questions at the aggregate level.

TEAM LEAD:

Nina Wiesehomeier​

IE University, Spain

nina.wiesehomeier@googlemail.com

Vlastimil Havlik

Masaryk University, Czech Republic

Bojana Kocijan

Central European Un​iversity, Budapest​


Team Parliamentary elite surveys sets out to measure political attitudes in parliamentary elites in different regional contexts. We conceptualize political attitudes as three categories: populist, pluralist and elitist. To measure these attitudes we draw on tools used to study these phenomena at the individual level (e.g. public opinion surve​ys) and adjust them to the specific context of parliamentary elites. In the first project phase (late 2014 and first half of 2015) we conduct pilot surveys in several ​Latin American countries (in collaboration with the University of Salamanca and the Parliamentary Elite Survey PELA), a candidate survey in Greece and a parliamentary elite survey in Croatia.

TEAM LEADS:

Ioannis Andreadis

Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece

john@polsci.auth.gr

Saskia Pauline Ruth

University of Zurich, Switzerland

saskia.ruth@zda.uzh.ch

Bojana Kocijan

Central European University, Budapest​

Paul Kenny

Australian National University​


Team Surveys focuses on the study of populism through the use of public opinion surveys. We are interested in measuring populist attitudes at the mass level, as well as in trying to understand social and psychological factors that may be associated with susceptibility to and support for this kind of political discourse. We work with a variety of measurement methods and apply them in multiple regional studies. We look for scales that are conceptually rigorous and can be used reliably in different countries, and try to identify what are the correlates of populist attitude at the mass level in various regions. The final purpose is to better understand the demand-side of populist politics, and its contextual variations​.

TEAM LEAD:

Levente (Levi) Littvay​

CEU Budapest

littvayl@ceu-budapest.edu

Agnes Akkerman

VU University of Amsterdam

Andrej Zaslove​

Radbound University, Netherlands

Bram Spruyt

VU Brussles

Bruno Castanho Silva​

CEU, Budapest

Matt Singer​

University of Connecticut, USA

Matthijis Roodujin

University of Amsterdam

Nebojsa Blanusa

University of Zagreb

Sarah de Lange

University of Amsterdam

Wouter van der Brug​

University of Amsterdam

Gijs Schumacher​

University of Southern Denmark

Ioannis Andreadis​

Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece​

Paul DeBell

Ohio State University

Paul Kenny

Australian National University​


There's nothing here.

TEAM LEAD:

Jennifer Mccoy

Georgia State University

jmccoy@gsu.edu